Images from Death Valley National Park.

March 18 - 25, 2004

Summer average temperature, over 100 degrees. Average annual rainfall; 1.96 inches. 282 feet below sea level, it's tough to believe that this place is in California. On the left, a photo of the Panamint Mountains. On the right a dry lake bed called Racetrack Playa, with a rock that appears to be borrowing it's way into the dirt. First of all, it's important to know that each and every rock that is doing this has a name. Second, the largest of these sliding rocks weighs 705 pounds! For a much better in-depth explanation for those of you who are curious; click here.

Click on an image to see a larger version.

Use your back button to return.

This area is known as Devil's Golf Course by geologists. Scott's drawing captures a view that contains salt flats and snow capped mountains in the background.

Show me a larger version.

Show me a close up of the drawing.

Use your back button to return.

 

A view across the valley floor towards the Amargosa mountain range.

Show me a larger version.

Show me a little more detail.

Use your back button to return.



Near Badwater in the park, you'll find many salt pan areas. This is what they look like up close.

Show me a larger version of this image.

Show me a close up of the drawing.

Use your back button to return.

 

There are dune fields in the park as well. The most visited would be the Mesquite dunes adjacent to Stovepipe Wells. The dunes are the result of millions and millions of years of erosion. Winds carry the sand particles towards the mountains where they are left to pile up. On the right is Dante's view. From here the viewer can see on a clear day, Telescope Peak to Badwater. The difference in elevation between the two is 11,331 feet, the greatest topographic relief in the lower 48 states.

Click on an image to see a larger version.

Use your back button to return.

 
 
All images and text ©swp2002-2004 use in any media prohibited without written consent of the owner.