Images from Yellowstone National Park.

Sept 3 - 11, 2003



 

 

 

 

 

 




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       Just about at the half way point in the National Park Project, Scott returned to Yellowstone National Park. When Scott was here last, the National Park Project was something existing only in his dreams. The work from that first visit resides in storage along with many other artifacts from Scott's pre-project life. Will the reality of two years on the road bring new meaning to those items tucked away awaiting his return? One can only guess that like any transition in life, it's the journey that reveals the true, lasting meaning of what has gone before. We can't know the significance of the products of our lives until a new, grander perspective has been realized. Poetically, Scott's artistic style consists of blending several perspectives into one, more deeply informed view. Each work becomes a metaphor of life experience in it's own way.
         The National Park Project when completed will in turn become it's own grand work. The whole forming from the combined perspectives of two years in the life of a very tallented artist. The significance of the NPP, assured by it's scale, vision and by the beauty of it's execution, will only truely become known as new chapters in Scott's life are written. We are all fortunate to be allowed to read this particular chapter as the artist writes it.


In the Northeast section of Yellowstone we find the Lamar Valley area. The most likely place to find the majestic Grizzly bear is right about here. Just sit still and be patient. You'll either come up with a great drawing, or you'll be looking for your running shoes.

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Near the West Thumb area of Yellowstone Lake is the Geyser Basin. Natural hot springs abound in this area. Scott had to draw fast to catch the guyser as it erupted.


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Descriptions of the clay mud springs have been recorded since 1827 and they are well depicted even today by Scott's drawings from 2003. For more good information about the West Thumb and Grant Village area take some time to read this page from the government website.


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Before painting the Lower Falls, Scott desides to check out a few different perspectives. We're lucky to be able to compare for ourselves the process of interpretation.

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In the center of the park and one of it's most famous icons; the Lower Falls on the Yellowstone River attracts visitors like free bugspray during an Alaskan mosquito hatch. Scott chose this overlook to create a beautiful interpretation for us to enjoy.

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That's quite a bit of good work from Yellowstone. Perhaps it's time to read a good book and take a little nap?

 

 
Copyright 2001-2012

All text and images ©SWP 2001- 2012 use in any media prohibited without permission.